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BROTAN LAS AMAPOLAS: POESÍA BRITÁNICA DE TRINCHERA… 93 Revista de Historia Militar, 124 (2018), pp. 93-128. ISSN: 0482-5748 ABSTRACT Every November, year after year, poppies bloom on the lapels of British and Commonwealth citizens. Paper flowers that are hand-made by members of the British Legion, sold in charity markets, parishes, barracks, libraries, all kinds of shops, and worn as a symbol of remembrance of the fallen in all wars. The origin of the symbol is very well-known: the poem In Flanders Fields, written by one of those soldier-poets who experienced the horrors of the Western Front during World War I, lieutenant colonel John McCrae. He was one among many: the so-called ‘War to End All Wars’ transformed poets into soldiers and soldiers into poets, most of them killed or missing in action on the battlefields of Europe. This article is a brief story of the lives of five distinguished poets and an introduction to their most remarkable poetic works, some of which are translated into Spanish for the first time. KEY WORDS: World War I, Trench Poetry, Lord Kitchener, Isaac Ro-senberg, Gallipoli, Wilfred Owen, Battle of the Somme, In Flanders Fields, ‘Tommy’, Ypres, lieutenant colonel John McCrae, British Army, Armistice Day, poppy, Remembrance Day, November 1918, Rudyard Kipling, Unk-nown British Warrior.* * * * *


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