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Varios 110 TRADUCCIONES Supporting brigade commander How does the cavalry squadron support the brigade commander in mission command? The cavalry squadron is the brigade commander’s primary asset to develop the situation and provide timely information that will refine subsequent courses of action (CoAs) for the brigade’s decisive operation. The cavalry squadron improves situational understanding for the commander by providing a better understand of the tactical, human and political dynamics within an area of operation. Cavalry squadrons help visualize operations in the context of mission variables to facilitate decisive operations in time and space with a greater degree of detail, accuracy and fidelity. Cavalry squadrons direct the execution of decisive operations with additional flexibility, adaptability, synchronization and integration that moves the BCT to concentrate strengths against enemy weakness. Finally, cavalry squadrons assess progress through continuous reconnaissance to help modify existing and/or developing plans to allocate BCT assets based on changing tactical situations. Mission command in R&S tasks How does the brigade and cavalry squadron use mission command in conducting R&S tasks? Mission command enables commanders and staffs to counter the inherent uncertainty of military operations. Squadron commanders conduct R&S to protect the force and to seize, retain and exploit the initiative. The commander sets reconnaissance priorities early since squadrons will precede main-body movement and operate with less time available for troop-leading procedures (TLP). After a brigade receives its initial warning order (warnord) from higher headquarters and publishes Warnord 1, the cavalry squadron has already begun its TLPs. Unlike most battalions, however, the cavalry squadron is operating on a highly accelerated timeline and initiates movement prior to other battalions. Therefore, brigade and squadron staffs must work closely during mission analysis to conduct parallel planning. More importantly, the relationship and direct dialogue between the brigade and squadron commander is paramount for successful CoA development and to allocate IC assets and other enablers (artillery, aviation) appropriately. Collaboration and dialogue between brigade and squadron is essential in developing shared understanding. After brigade commanders have an understanding of the problem, they can visualize an end state for the cavalry squadron; describe time, space, resources (initial), purpose and action; and direct the squadron through use of mission orders (Warnord 2, Annex L). Cavalry squadrons are unique in conducting R&S. They conduct parallel planning with the brigade, operating within broad guidance to conduct missions in front of, on the rear of and on the BCT’s flanks. Commander’s intent How does the commander’s intent facilitate mission command? The commander’s intent articulates the reason for an operation. It explains the expanded –or, in other words, broader– purpose of an operation and allows subordinates to understand what is expected of them to accomplish a mission. The commander’s intent becomes the basis on which staffs and subordinate leaders develop plans and transform them into action. During the planning process, squadron commanders issue planning guidance before, during and after dialogue with the brigade commander’s staff. This is usually in the form of a directed CoA with planning guidance for each warfighting function. Commanders are able to direct a CoA because of their ability to understand the problem, visualize the end state and describe it to their staff and subordinate commanders. Though staffs may understand the final array of forces on the battlefield, they must refine the CoA, conduct CoA analysis and synchronize assets. Memorial de Caballería, n.º 86 - Diciembre 2018


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